Reversing Climate Change - What Can Science And Technology Do?

Luke McMillan

Reversing Climate Change - What Can Science And Technology Do?

I will be presenting a simplified overview of current Negative Emissions Technologies (NET's), which have the potential of ameliorating anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We will discuss the advantages and pitfalls of NET's including potential environment degradation issues, cost vs benefit considerations and general social opinions. Furthermore I will further elaborate on enhanced weathering research I am currently assisting with in Tropical North Queensland.

Luke McMillan is a recent Bachelor Graduate of Geo-Science Planning on commencing an Honours in Geochemistry in 2020. Chemical tracers and signatures are an ever more powerful tool in understanding the real roots behind what is happening in the microscopic realm of the living and non-living alike. Understanding what is happening at the chemical level has always been at the forefront of Climate Change research, however, the polls are in and it is undeniable that Anthropogenic Climate Change is here to stay. To move forward we must focus on two key aspects 

1. Changing the perception of our species as whole and convincing politicians and world leaders that the time to act is now and;
2. Quantifying and implementing tools for change and lifestyle habits to decrease our carbon footprint on the world, including the benefit of strategic technology. 

This presentation will be focused on the later, more specifically looking into Negative Emission Technologies (NETs). NETs are anything that remove CO2 from the atmosphere, including reforestation, burial of plant biomass and enhanced weathering. We will be investigating NETs as whole, looking at the pros and cons, the social opinions and potential environment effects. More specifically however i will be delivering insight into one method, Enhanced Weathering, which is currently being researched at James Cook University, Cairns. The Project is attempting to quantify how Enhanced weathering can both sequester CO2 from the atmosphere and increase soil fertility and food security. 

Luke McMillan is a recent Bachelor Graduate of Geo-Science commencing an Honours in Geochemistry in 2020. Chemical tracers are an ever more powerful tool in understanding the roots behind what is happening in the microscopic realm, living and non-living alike. Understanding what is happening at the chemical level has always been at the forefront of Climate Change research, however, the polls are in and it is undeniable that anthropogenic Climate Change is here to stay. To move forward we must focus on two key aspects 

1. Changing the perception of our species as whole and the way we use consumables and enegry; convincing eachother and world leaders that the time to act is now and;
2. Quantifying and implementing new industry methods and lifestyle habits to decrease our carbon footprint on the world, including the benefit of strategic technology. 

This presentation will be focused on the latter, more specifically looking into Negative Emission Technologies (NETs). NETs are anything that remove CO2 from the atmosphere, including reforestation, burial of plant biomass and enhanced weathering. We will be investigating NETs as whole, looking at the pros and cons, the social opinions and potential environment effects. More specifically however i will be delivering insight into one method, Enhanced Weathering, which is currently being researched at James Cook University, Cairns. The Project is attempting to quantify how Enhanced weathering can both sequester CO2 from the atmosphere and increase soil fertility and food security.